Als mensen overbodig worden ….

Gedragspsycholoog Daniel Kahneman in gesprek met historicus/filosoof Yuval Noah Harari (schrijver van ‘Sapiens,’ geschiedenis van de mensheid). Het is bedoeld als een gesprek, maar Kahneman is meer de interviewer. De historicus is bezorgd dat mensen overbodig worden; dat werklozen koest gehouden worden met computer games en drugs; dat een langer leven alleen weggelegd is voor de rijken; dat we geen idee hebben van de ontwrichting die zal ontstaan als het menselijk brein wordt gekoppeld aan computers. Wat fragmenten:

The age of the masses is over. We are no longer in the First World War, where you take millions of soldiers, give each one a rifle and have them run forward. And the same thing perhaps is happening in the economy. Maybe the biggest question of 21st century economics is what will be the need in the economy for most people in the year 2050.

And once most people are no longer really necessary, for the military and for the economy, the idea that you will continue to have mass medicine is not so certain. Could be. It’s not a prophecy, but you should take very seriously the option that people will lose their military and economic value, and medicine will follow.

(…) Death is optional. And if you think about it from the viewpoint of the poor, it looks terrible, because throughout history, death was the great equalizer. The big consolation of the poor throughout history was that okay, these rich people, they have it good, but they’re going to die just like me. But think about the world, say, in 50 years, 100 years, where the poor people continue to die, but the rich people, in addition to all the other things they get, also get an exemption from death. That’s going to bring a lot of anger.

(…) What might happen in the next hundred years on that level of daily life, of intimate relationships? Anything is possible. You look at Japan today, and Japan is maybe 20 years ahead of the world in everything. And you see these new social phenomena of people having relationships with virtual spouses. And you have people who never leave the house and just live through computers. And I don’t know, maybe it’s the future, maybe it isn’t, but for me, the amazing thing is that you’d have thought, given the biological background of humankind, that this is impossible, yet we see that it is possible. Apparently, Homo Sapiens is even more malleable than we tend to think.